Turn Yourself into a Better Public Speaker

Public Speaker Stage FrightWhat do people fear more than spiders, darkness, heights, flying in airplanes, confined spaces and even death? It’s glossophobia – public speaking or stage fright. An effective public speaker knows how to overcome the anxiety of presenting and deliver the right message.  Listen to how to do it.

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN FROM SHELLEY BAMBERGER, COMMUNICATION EXPERT

WHAT ARE THE CHARACTERISTICS OF A GOOD PUBLIC SPEAKER?  (2:26 in)

In Shelley’s words – The best communicator connects with his or her audience.

Tip – Do your homework to understand what the audience needs and is looking for from you. Then adapt your message to fit those needs.

WHAT COMMUNICATION SKILLS NEED IMPROVING? (5:07 in)

In Shelley’s words – What is it about my message that matters to the audience. The second issue is the overuse of filler words (you know, like, uh, basically, etc.) is only part of the equation.

Tip – Record and critique your presentation to become more aware of filler words. Assess whether your message resonated with the audience. Focus on  “You” rather than “I” in the presentation.

WHAT IS IGNORED IN MAKING PRESENTATIONS? (8:50 in)

In Shelley’s words – Practice. You have to do the hard work that’s needed to do well.

Tip – Practice in short spurts, several times before your presentation. You’ll retain more in long term memory.

WHAT MAKES PRESENTATIONS STAND OUT? (10:42 in)

In Shelley’s words – Ask questions. When the audience answers a question the information goes into their long term memory. Tell stories. By telling stories you are in sync with your audience.

Tip – Figure out which kind of question styles and stories may work for the audience you’re addressing.

IS HUMOR NECESSARY? (12:36 in)

In Shelley’s words – I think humor may be over rated. It’s not critical to deliver a message but it can provide an avenue to connect with the audience.

Tip – Don’t tell jokes. Interact with your audience to listen for when they laugh. They may provide a humorous anecdote or story you can capitalize on.

HOW CAN YOU OVERCOME SPEECH ANXIETY? (15:15 in)

In Shelley’s words – An element of fear is good. To control it the answer is square breathing.

Tip – Learn how to increase your oxygen to calm the nerves.

 

Small Business Healthcare – High Wire Act

Healthcare High Wire ActPwC the international accounting and consulting firm, projects that healthcare costs in the U.S. will rise 6.5% next year, the same as this year. That is more than 4 times the estimated rate of inflation according to Statistica, a quantitative research firm. Nevertheless, PwC says healthcare cost inflation could escalate further.

So what is an employer to do? We’ll talk with a group benefits consultant about how small business is coping with healthcare costs for their employees.

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN FROM FRANK LOPEZ, GROUP BENEFITS CONSULTANT AT SAXON FINANCIAL

PRIOR TO THE ELECTION, ARE COMPANIES APPROACHING HOW TO HANDLE HEALTHCARE IN 2017 DIFFERENTLY? (3:26 in)

In Frank’s words –   Not really. Most employers are frustrated with the costs and forced penalties.  But a lot of people are relying on their employer to provide and guide them.

Tip – Having healthcare benefits is becoming more important for hiring and employee retention.

WHO IS SEEKING TO CREATE MORE PART TIME JOBS TO LIMIT THEIR HEALTH CARE COSTS?  (4:50 in)

In Frank’s words – You’ll find that strategy being put into play with retail and service industries.

Tip – More important than part-time / full time is the total number of employees in the company since the government healthcare requirement begins at 50 employees.

ARE EMPLOYEES BEING ASKED TO CARRY MORE OF THE HEALTH COST BURDEN?  (6:28 in)

In Frank’s words – For the small business, it’s inevitable for them to be able to sustain a benefits plan. For those businesses between 2-50 employees, they may have to cut out their dependents. 

Tip –Companies see having less or more than 50 employees as the most important factor.

FOR COMPANIES UNDER 50 EMPLOYEES THAT ARE NOT REQUIRED TO PROVIDE HEALTHCARE, WHY ARE THEY OFFERING HEALTH BENEFITS?  (8:30 in)

In Frank’s words – The employee is demanding it. They are coming back after the exchange not being as successful as they had hoped clamoring for benefits.  

Tip – Not offering health benefits makes it a lot easier for employees to look elsewhere for a job.

FOR EMPLOYERS WHO ARE DIRECTING THEIR EMPLOYEES TO THE EXCHANGE, IN WHAT WAYS ARE THEY EQUIPPING THEM TO MAKE THESE DECISIONS?  (9:30 in)

In Frank’s words – I don’t think the employer is taking on the responsibility of educating and hand holding their people. 

Tip – Outsourcing this responsibility may be the best approach.

WHAT CAN BE DONE TO STOP THE ESCALATION OF HEALTHCARE COSTS  (11:23 in)

In Frank’s words – Congress has to start working together. In the immediate future I expect to see what we’ve been seeing. To stabilize the system, it will need to control costs of the hospitals, physicians, and pharmacies.

Tip – Look into a multiple group, self funding health pool.

WHAT ARE SOME THINGS A BROKER CAN PROVIDE? (15:44 in)

In Frank’s words – Show the employers what the options and costs are for individuals and as a group. It’s eye opening.

Tip – Push your broker for all the options and impartial information.

How to Make a Family Business Last

Family Business
Tina & Dale Engdahl of Exciting Windows by Apollo

Family business is the bedrock of the American economy. More than half of the national GDP comes from them. However, when the reins are transferred from the first generation to the second, 70% of them perish. How do you make a family business last?

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN FROM DALE & TINA ENGDAHL, OWNERS OF THE FAMILY BUSINESS EXCITING WINDOWS BY APOLLO

WHAT MAKES YOUR BUSINESS WORK WELL?  (2:38 in)

In Dale’s words –   We treat our customers in the way we want to be treated. We do what we say and say what we’re going to do.

Tips – Have a clear division of responsibility. Have a definite plan for paying yourself and employees. Make sure all bases from client contact to project completion are being executed reliably and on time.

AS A HUSBAND – WIFE TEAM, HOW DO YOU HANDLE COMMUNICATION ABOUT THE BUSINESS IN RELATION TO YOUR PERSONAL LIFE? (4:34 in)

In Tina’s words – We talk about it until one or the other says, I’ve had enough. Because we’re so different we don’t think alike. A lot of thinking takes place before anything is accomplished.

Tip – Respect and understand each other’s position. Seek common ground.

WHAT ARE THE TOUGHEST BUSINESS DECISIONS? (9:12 in)

In Tina’s words – During a recession when you have to decide what you can’t spend money on anymore. In Dale’s words – on a personal level and a business level.

Tip – Saving ahead to withstand tough times is very important.

DO YOU TAKE VACATIONS SEPARATELY OR TOGETHER? (10:45 in)

In Tina’s words – It’s important to get away alone and together.

Tip – Take a break to stay strong!

HOW DO YOU RETAIN EMPLOYEES? (12:32 in)

In Dale’s words – Listen to them. Be flexible with their schedule. Pay them well. Treat them the way I would want to be treated.

Tip – Praise employees for a job well done.

HOW DO YOU INVOLVE & MANAGE OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS IN THE BUSINESS? (13:40 in)

Tip – Let your kids decide whether they want to be involved in the business. If they participate, teach them to assume the responsibilities as if they were just employees.

WHAT SHOULD YOU REMEMBER TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS? (16:00 in)

In Tina’s words – Your client will always be your boss.

Tip – Realize that while you have the freedom to re-arrange your schedule for personal reasons, time away from work will have to be made up.

 

Using Business Attorney Keeps Wolves Out of My Hen House

Business AttorneyAlthough small businesses face legal dilemmas or issues periodically, the majority of them are reluctant to contact an attorney. Maybe cost is a perceived problem or they’re unsure as to whether using an attorney is necessary. But as a business attorney reminds us today, it’s often lack of preparation for unanticipated issues that get a business into legal trouble.

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN FROM WILLIAM MITCHELL, BUSINESS ATTORNEY, CERTIFIED MEDIATOR

WHAT ARE SOME COMMON WAYS BUSINESSES GET THEMSELVES INTO TROUBLE?  (2:45 in)

In Bill’s words –   Failure to incorporate. Failure to have contracts in place. A handshake deal is not always the best approach.

Tip – Have documents in place for the formation of the business, how the business will run, work contracts, real estate, and what responsibilities each owner will have if there is more than one business owner.

ARE THEIR LIMITATIONS WITH USING ONLINE FORMS? (4:29 in)

In Bill’s words – You need to understand that documentation is only part of the equation.

Tip – Consider issues that may come up related to hiring practices, marital status, previous business relationships, bank loans, required operating records, etc.

HOW IMPORTANT IS IT FOR A COMPANY WITH EMPLOYEES TO HAVE WORK AND BEHAVIOR POLICIES? (7:30 in)

In Bill’s words – It’s critical that an employer have a well written employee handbook. The person that employs 7 to 15 people may need this more than a large company because the large company is sending out email reminders and annual updates. For small business, the employee handbook may be the only communication they receive.  

Tip – Make sure you review your handbook annually or bi-annually. Have a signature page to acknowledge that the employee has received it. Changes in government regulations, use of employer provided equipment like cellphones, and the use of social media demand it.

WHAT ARE COMMON MISTAKES WITH HOW BUSINESSES HIRE EMPLOYEES? (11:40 in)

In Bill’s words – Not establishing clear expectations for work, pay, vacations, personal time, use of company equipment. You have to be careful when you’re asking an employee to not do something that may be a constitutionally protected right.

Tip – Consider whether a non-compete agreement with an employee is appropriate.

HOW CAN A COMPANY AVOID LITIGATION WITH A DISGRUNTLED EMPLOYEE (15:12 in)

In Bill’s words – Having things in writing. One of the things that sometimes puts employers in hot water is not paying their employees when they terminate their employment. 

Tip – Have two people from the employer’s side involved in separation conversations.

WHAT’S THE RECOURSE FOR TROUBLE IN COLLECTING PAYMENT FOR SERVICES? (16:17 in)

In Bill’s words – After 60, 90, 120 days a simple letter from an attorney reminding them of what is owed may provide the right amount of motivation. 

Tip – Small claims court is available up to $3,000. Ask yourself how much of your resources do you want to spend to collect payment if going to court appears to be the only option.

IF I’M LOOKING FOR A BUSINESS ATTORNEY, WHAT DO I WANT TO FIND OUT? (18:31 in)

Tip – Inquire about how the attorney works and charges. Can the work you need done be completed on a flat fee basis? Decide on who you feel you’re comfortable with and can trust.